Game Day for Bimbos and Sweet Valley High’s Low Blow

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This week was filled with some body image garbage.

(1) My colleague Amy Jussel brought this fabulous story to my attention this week: Bimbo Bait: Is Silence or Outrage the Solution for Digital Drek?

She says: “Just when you thought media influence on body image had reached the tipping point of toxicity, our pals at Beauty and the Breast (and parents, Feministing, mashable, and industry colleagues at Edelman Digital) are reporting in disgust on this new web game, Miss Bimbo making the rounds in Europe where “Girls are encouraged to compete against each other to become the “hottest, coolest, most famous bimbo in the whole world.” CNN reports, “When a girl signs up, they are given a naked virtual character to look after and pitted against other girls to earn “bimbo” dollars so they can dress her in sexy outfits and take her clubbing…” Read more here…

My opinion: Can we sprinkle some stronger body image salt on the proverbial gaping wound of female body image development? Check out the video!

I’m disturbed that some of girls are likening it to dressing up dolls. I don’t remember exchanging bimbo dollars or asking for boob jobs to get a better rating when I dressed up dolls in the past, do you?

Studies are now showing that girls are regarding dieting as “normal” behavior. That in fact it is “abnormal” to not diet! This is not surprising since they are inundated with diet articles, dolls that look like they’ve been dieting too long, and now, Bimbo World has landed. Will plastic surgery also be “normalized” to the point in which it will be “abnormal” to NOT get plastic surgery? A scary thought.

It would be great to have a game for girls in which they gain value by using their brains and their creativity instead of pumping up their boobs and bagging a billionaire.

(2) Kate Harding and Feministing let us know about Sweet Valley High’s bizarre change in character description of the featured twins:

Well, I guess Random House felt bad that size 6 teenagers were being denied the profound sense of failure that comes with seeing “perfect” juxtaposed with a size you can’t achieve. So in their re-released versions, the twins are a “perfect size 4.”

 

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My Opinion: On the unfortunate female quest to conquer perfect, its amazing that “feeling good about our bodies” is pushed just a little bit further out of reach by this teen series.

The Sweet Valley High MySpace has this to say in the “about me” section: “Elizabeth: I tend to play down my looks. I’m most comfortable in khaki shorts and a polo shirt, with my long blond hair pulled back in a barrette or practical ponytail. Maybe it is because I think who a person is inside and what she does is more important than how she looks.”

How do you think Miss Elizabeth feels about loosing a size?

Think nobody is looking at this information? They have “312 My Space Friends” )

The video on today’s (March 28) Feministing tells the story. Warning to those faint of heart: bad language is used in this video.

Hope next week is better.

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One Response

  1. I guess no section of the media is safe…the ‘net has long been bombarded with bad body image crapola, but books? There should be no standard let alone an idea of “perfection”. Let these kids be who they are…

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